How is CPR performed differently?

CPR performed differently

Hello Reader nawafnet, welcome to our exclusive article on “How is CPR performed differently?” CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) is a life-saving technique used to save someone’s life in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. This technique is necessary when a person’s heart stops beating, and their breathing stops. In such situations, every second counts, and with the right technique, one can save a human life. However, have you ever thought about the various ways in which CPR can be performed? Well, in this article, we will take a deep dive into the different methods of performing CPR and their strengths and weaknesses.

Introduction

CPR is an essential technique that has saved countless lives over the years. It is a combination of chest compressions and rescue breathing, which helps to keep a person’s blood circulating and their airways open. But, the method of performing CPR can vary based on who is performing it, the setting in which it is performed, and the equipment available. In this article, we will take a closer look at the different ways in which CPR is performed and their unique advantages and disadvantages.

In this article, we will explore:

  • Seven steps involved in traditional CPR
  • The effectiveness of hands-only CPR compared to traditional CPR
  • The usage of Automated External Defibrillators (AED) during CPR
  • Child CPR and Infant CPR
  • Compression-only CPR
  • CPR techniques for drowning victims
  • Combining mechanical CPR with manual CPR

Traditional CPR

Traditional CPR involves a series of steps that require the caregiver to administer rescue breaths and chest compressions. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

Step Description
Step 1 Check the patient for consciousness and breathing. If they are not breathing, call for medical help.
Step 2 Place the patient on their back and tilt their head back to open their airway.
Step 3 Administer two rescue breaths to the patient, pinching their nose closed and blowing into their mouth for about one second each time.
Step 4 Interlock your hands and place them at the center of the patient’s chest. Press down on the chest with your body weight, ensuring that your arms remain straight.
Step 5 Administer 30 chest compressions, ensuring that you push down at least 2 inches on the chest.
Step 6 Repeat rescue breaths and chest compressions until the patient recovers or medical help arrives.
Step 7 If an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is available, follow the provided instructions to utilize the device.

The traditional CPR method is highly effective and has saved countless lives. But, it requires the caregiver to have specific training and experience, which can be a challenge for someone who is not a healthcare professional. Additionally, administering rescue breaths to a stranger can put the caregiver at risk of contracting infectious diseases.

Hands-Only CPR

Hands-only CPR eliminates the need for rescue breaths and involves chest compressions only. Here are the steps:

  1. Check the patient for consciousness and breathing. If they are not breathing, call for medical help.
  2. Place the patient on their back and tilt their head back to open their airway.
  3. Place your hands on the center of the patient’s chest, interlocking your fingers, and ensuring that your arms remain straight.
  4. Administer 100-120 chest compressions per minute, ensuring that you push down at least 2 inches of the chest.
  5. Continue chest compressions until the patient recovers or medical help arrives.

Hands-only CPR is simpler and faster to perform and can be used to save lives in public spaces where no medical equipment is available. However, it is not always effective if the patient is suffering from respiratory failure rather than full cardiac arrest.

AED Usage during CPR

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is a portable electronic device that helps to restore a person’s heartbeat and breathing during a cardiac emergency. Here’s how to use an AED:

  1. Switch on the AED machine and attach the electrode pads to the patient’s chest. Ensure that the pads are firmly attached.
  2. Press the ‘analyze’ button, which will allow the machine to determine whether a shock is needed or not.
  3. If the result indicates a shock is required, press the ‘shock’ button, which will deliver a shock to the patient.
  4. Immediately commence CPR after the shock is delivered.

An AED is highly effective in restoring the heart to its normal rhythm, but it is not a substitute for CPR. Instead, it’s a tool to complement standard CPR techniques.

Child and Infant CPR

The CPR technique for children and infants is slightly different from that of adults. Here’s how to perform CPR on a child or infant:

Age of Patient Procedure
Child over 1 year old Follow the same steps as for adult CPR.
Infant (0-1 year old) Place the baby on their back and compress their chest with two fingers, placing them between the infant’s nipples.

CPR on children and infants is more delicate and requires specific training to avoid any injuries to the small patients. It is recommended to learn this technique only from qualified healthcare providers.

Compression-only CPR

Compression-only CPR is very similar to hands-only CPR. However, it involves faster and deeper chest compressions, relying entirely on chest compressions.

The steps to follow for compression-only CPR are:

  1. Check the patient’s consciousness and breathing. If they are not breathing, call for medical help.
  2. Place the patient on their back, ensuring that the head is tilted back to open their airway.
  3. Begin compressions by placing two hands on the center of the patient’s chest and pushing down hard and fast, compressing the chest to 2 to 2.4 inches deep.
  4. Continue compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 per minute.
  5. Continue chest compressions until the patient recovers or medical help arrives.

Compression-only CPR is an excellent choice for untrained individuals as it is simple to learn. However, it may not be effective for some sudden cardiac arrests that require breathing assistance.

CPR for Drowning Victims

CPR for drowning victims is a slightly different technique, since drowning accidents often affect the patient’s respiratory system.

The following is the procedure for CPR on a drowning victim:

  1. Check for the patient’s consciousness and breathing.
  2. Place them on their back and open their airway by tilting their head back.
  3. Administer two rescue breaths, pinching their nose closed and breathing into their mouth for about one second each time.
  4. Begin chest compressions, ensuring that you push at least 2 inches of the chest.
  5. Resume rescue breaths and chest compressions until the patient recovers or medical help arrives.

Mechanical and Manual CPR

Mechanical CPR devices can help reduce manpower and ensure that chest compressions are delivered more effectively and consistently.

The following is a procedure for mechanical and manual CPR:

  1. Place the automated machine on the patient’s chest and activate it
  2. Attach the suction cups from the machine to the patient’s chest and start doing chest compressions.

Combining mechanical CPR with manual CPR can enhance the effectiveness of chest compressions and reduce manual effort, suitable for prolonged CPR procedures.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q1: How do I know if CPR is working?

Various signs can indicate if the person performing CPR is correctly administering chest compressions. For instance, you might notice the patients’ chest rising and falling with each breath. Additionally, the patient might cough or vomit, which indicates that their lungs are clear.

Q2: Is CPR painful for the victim?

Administering CPR can cause some discomfort to the patient since it involves applying pressure to their chest, ribs, and back. However, it is essential to follow the procedure as it might help save their life.

Q3: Can you perform CPR for yourself?

It is impractical to perform CPR to yourself since it requires both hands to perform chest compressions. If you are alone and face a situation that requires CPR, call for medical help immediately.

Q4: What risks are associated with CPR?

CPR might cause some injuries such as broken ribs, punctured lungs, or bruises to the chest area, but the benefits usually outweigh any potential adverse effects.

Q5: How long should I continue CPR before giving up?

It is crucial to continue practicing CPR until medical help arrives or if any signs of life are evident.

Q6: What are the recommended intervals for administering rescue breaths during CPR?

Rescue breaths should be administered after every thirty chest compressions.

Q7: Can Hands-only CPR cause damage to the heart?

No, Chest compressions done through Hands-only CPR cannot cause any damage to Heart but can cause minor injuries on the skin or ribs

Q8: In what circumstances can you use an AED during CPR?

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is primarily used during CPR on someone who has recently had cardiac arrest. It is also useful when a person has any pulseless ventricular tachycardia(Wikipedia).

Q9: Can I teach myself CPR?

It is possible to learn CPR through various online resources. However, it is recommended to seek professional training from an accredited institution that can provide hands-on training and certification.

Q10: Can you still get COVID-19 from performing CPR?

Rescue breaths can pose a significant risk for spreading the coronavirus. It’s recommended to use personal protective equipment while administering CPR.

Q11: Can kids learn CPR?

Youths can learn CPR, but it is essential to learn the right technique and age-appropriate methods.

Q12: Is mouth-to-mouth still necessary in CPR?

Hands-only CPR can be done without mouth-to-mouth, but traditional CPR (mouth-to-mouth) is still recommended for certain circumstances, especially in children and in drowning accidents.

Q13: Is CPR 100% effective in saving someone’s life?

CPR can be successful in restoring a person’s heartbeat, but it is not guaranteed to be 100% effective in every situation. Time plays a major role in determining its success rate, calling for help as soon as possible would increase a patient’s chances of survival.

Conclusion

CPR is a crucial technique that can help save lives during a cardiac arrest emergency. The method of performing CPR can vary based on the caregiver’s expertise, the victim’s age, and equipment available. In this article, we have looked at the strengths and weaknesses of different CPR techniques, such as traditional CPR, Hands-only CPR, AED usage, etc. It is essential to have a basic understanding of these techniques to help those in need and even save a life. Ensure you learn CPR through proper training and certification, which can help you gain confidence and prepare you to deal with emergency situations.

If you have any queries related to CPR or any other topic, feel free to reach out to our team of experts, who are available 24/7 at your service. We would love to hear your thoughts and feedback on this article.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this article is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professionals with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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